In the days since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine early last Thursday morning, protests have erupted around the world against Russian President Vladimir Putin’s decision to launch a deadly war.

In Prague, capital of the Czech Republic, hundreds of demonstrators turned out for an antiwar protest shortly after Thursday’s predawn assault began, donning blue and yellow face paint — to represent the colors of Ukraine’s flag— and waving Ukrainian flags and holding signs calling for a stop to the invasion.

Similar scenes have played out in dozens of countries, including Poland, Germany, Turkey, Hungary, Japan and the United States. In New York City’s Times Square, demonstrators unfurled a giant Ukrainian flag banner to show solidarity with Ukrainian citizens.

But some of the most striking protests have occurred in Russia, where more than 6,000 people have been detained in antiwar protests against Putin since Thursday, when his military campaign in Ukraine began.

Police officers in Moscow on Feb. 24 detain a woman at a protest against Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. (Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images)

Pro-Ukraine demonstrators hold Ukrainian flags and placards at a demonstration in support of Ukraine at the Wenceslas Square in Prague, the Czech capital, on Feb. 24. (Michal Cizek/AFP via Getty Images)

A woman with stripes of blue and yellow paint across her eyes protests in front of Brandenburg Gate in Berlin, Germany, on Feb. 24. (Hannibal Hanschke/Getty Images)

Antiwar demonstrators in Lafayette Park, participate in a rally against Russia’s military operation in Ukraine near the White House on Feb. 24 in Washington, D.C. (Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images)

A banner with a likeness of Russian President Vladimir Putin, spattered with fake blood, at a protest in front of the Russian Embassy in Mexico City on Feb. 24. (Daniel Cardenas/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

Police officers detain a female demonstrator at a protest in Moscow against Russia’s invasion of Ukraine on Feb. 24. (Alexander Nemenov/AFP via Getty Images)

Protesters in Times Square in New York hold a long textile banner in Ukraine’s colors of blue and gold on Feb. 24. (Amir Hamja/Bloomberg via Getty /Images)

On Rothschild Boulevard in Tel Aviv, Israel, a young girl holds a sign at a rally in support of Ukraine on Feb. 26. (Ronen Zvulun/Reuters)

Demonstrators light flares at an antiwar protest in Poznan, Poland, on Feb. 26, 2022. (Piotr Skornicki/Agencja Wyborcza.pl via Reuters)

Police carry off an antiwar demonstrator in St. Petersburg on Feb. 24. (Sergei Mihailicenko/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

Protesters gather in a Tokyo business district on Feb. 26. (Kim Kyung-Hook/Reuters)

Police officers detain a demonstrator at a protest in central St. Petersburg on Feb. 24. (Sergei Mikhailichenko/AFP via Getty Images)

People in Poznan, Poland, take part in a protest of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, on Feb. 26. (Piotr Skornicki/Agencja Wyborcza.pl via Reuters)

Police officers detain a demonstrator in Moscow on Feb. 24. (Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images)

A Ukrainian woman living in Cyprus at a protest outside the Presidential Palace in Nicosia, Cyprus, on Feb. 26. (Petros Karadjias/AP Photo)

Where are Russian forces attacking Ukraine? Check out this explainer from Yahoo Immersive to find out.



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One thought on “Protests against Russia’s invasion of Ukraine erupt around the world”
  1. Protestors all over Russia and Belarus need to do a massive vehicle blockade to govt sites, choke key routes and military supply lines into Ukraine to make a statement. Much like how Ottawa Canada convoy protests froze a city for over a months

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